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Modifying children's food preferences: the effects of exposure and reward on acceptance of an unfamiliar vegetable

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
378 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
357 Mendeley
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Title
Modifying children's food preferences: the effects of exposure and reward on acceptance of an unfamiliar vegetable
Published in
European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2003
DOI 10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601541
Pubmed ID
Authors

J Wardle, M-L Herrera, L Cooke, E L Gibson

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate two interventions (one reward-based and one exposure-based) for increasing children's acceptance of an unfamiliar vegetable compared with a no-treatment control. It was predicted that the exposure condition would increase liking for, and consumption of, the vegetable relative to either the reward or control group. Using a randomized controlled design, participants were assigned to one of two intervention groups (exposure or reward) or to a no-treatment control condition, for a 2 week period. Liking for, and consumption of, red pepper was assessed before and after the treatment period. The study was conducted in three primary schools in London. Parental consent was obtained for 49 out of a possible 72 children. Interventions comprised eight daily sessions during which participants in the exposure group were offered a taste of sweet red pepper and told that they could eat as much as they liked. Participants in the reward group were shown a sheet of cartoon stickers and told that they could choose one of them on condition that they ate at least one piece of the pepper. The exposure-based intervention significantly increased both liking (P=0.006) and consumption (P=0.03) compared with the control group. The outcome of the reward intervention was intermediate and did not differ significantly from the exposure or control conditions. Repeated exposure to the taste of unfamiliar foods is a promising strategy for promoting liking of previously rejected foods in children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 357 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 3 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 339 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 65 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 61 17%
Student > Bachelor 57 16%
Researcher 46 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 22 6%
Other 64 18%
Unknown 42 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 77 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 59 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 57 16%
Social Sciences 31 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 8%
Other 46 13%
Unknown 59 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2020.
All research outputs
#610,686
of 15,383,358 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#272
of 3,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,862
of 233,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#2
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,383,358 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,244 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,374 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.