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Treatment choices for fevers in children under-five years in a rural Ghanaian district

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2010
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134 Mendeley
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Title
Treatment choices for fevers in children under-five years in a rural Ghanaian district
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2010
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-9-188
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justice Nonvignon, Moses KS Aikins, Margaret A Chinbuah, Mercy Abbey, Margaret Gyapong, Bertha NA Garshong, Saviour Fia, John O Gyapong

Abstract

Health care demand studies help to examine the behaviour of individuals and households during illnesses. Few of existing health care demand studies examine the choice of treatment services for childhood illnesses. Besides, in their analyses, many of the existing studies compare alternative treatment options to a single option, usually self-medication. This study aims at examining the factors that influence the choices that caregivers of children under-five years make regarding treatment of fevers due to malaria and pneumonia in a rural setting. The study also examines how the choice of alternative treatment options compare with each other.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
Kenya 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 128 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 15%
Researcher 17 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Student > Postgraduate 12 9%
Other 34 25%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 62 46%
Social Sciences 18 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 13 10%