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Enhancing dentate gyrus function with dietary flavanols improves cognition in older adults

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 4,796)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
101 news outlets
blogs
28 blogs
twitter
390 tweeters
patent
3 patents
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
weibo
2 weibo users
facebook
42 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
10 Google+ users
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
195 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
462 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Enhancing dentate gyrus function with dietary flavanols improves cognition in older adults
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, October 2014
DOI 10.1038/nn.3850
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam M Brickman, Usman A Khan, Frank A Provenzano, Lok-Kin Yeung, Wendy Suzuki, Hagen Schroeter, Melanie Wall, Richard P Sloan, Scott A Small

Abstract

The dentate gyrus (DG) is a region in the hippocampal formation whose function declines in association with human aging and is therefore considered to be a possible source of age-related memory decline. Causal evidence is needed, however, to show that DG-associated memory decline in otherwise healthy elders can be improved by interventions that enhance DG function. We addressed this issue by first using a high-resolution variant of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map the precise site of age-related DG dysfunction and to develop a cognitive task whose function localized to this anatomical site. Then, in a controlled randomized trial, we applied these tools to study healthy 50-69-year-old subjects who consumed either a high or low cocoa-containing diet for 3 months. A high-flavanol intervention was found to enhance DG function, as measured by fMRI and by cognitive testing. Our findings establish that DG dysfunction is a driver of age-related cognitive decline and suggest non-pharmacological means for its amelioration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 390 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 462 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 <1%
United States 4 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Sweden 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 438 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 90 19%
Researcher 84 18%
Student > Master 71 15%
Student > Bachelor 56 12%
Professor 26 6%
Other 79 17%
Unknown 56 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 93 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 18%
Neuroscience 67 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 4%
Other 78 17%
Unknown 80 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1258. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2021.
All research outputs
#5,574
of 18,025,039 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#13
of 4,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49
of 240,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#2
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,025,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,566 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.