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Eyes wide open: an essay on developing an engaged awareness in global medicine and public health

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Eyes wide open: an essay on developing an engaged awareness in global medicine and public health
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12914-014-0029-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

William B Ventres, Meredith P Fort

Abstract

BackgroundThere is a growing understanding of the role social determinants such as poverty, gender discrimination, racial prejudice, and economic inequality play on health and illness. While these determinants and effects may be challenging to identify in parts of high-income countries, they are patently obvious in many other areas of the world. How we react to these determinants and effects depends on what historical, cultural, ideological, and psychological characteristics we bring to our encounters with inequity, as well as how our feelings and thoughts inform our values and actions.DiscussionTo address these issues, we share a series of questions we have asked ourselves¿United States¿ citizens with experience living and working in Central America¿in relation to our encounters with inequity. We offer a conceptual framework for contemplating responses in hopes of promoting among educators and practitioners in medicine and public health an engaged awareness of how our every day work either perpetuates or breaks down barriers of social difference. We review key moments in our own experiences as global health practitioners to provide context for these questions.SummaryIntrospective reflection can help professionals in global medicine and public health recognize the dynamic roles that they play in the world. Such reflection can bring us closer to appreciating the forces that have worked both for and in opposition to global health, human rights, and well-being. It can help us recognize how place, time, environment, and context form the social determination of health. It is from this holistic perspective of social relations that we can work to effect fair, equitable, and protective environments as they relate to global medicine and public health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 29%
Student > Postgraduate 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Unspecified 3 7%
Other 13 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 41%
Unspecified 6 15%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 5%
Other 9 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,068,109
of 13,483,547 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#234
of 355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,654
of 232,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#24
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,483,547 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.