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Cupriavidus pinatubonensis AEO106 deals with copper-induced oxidative stress before engaging in biodegradation of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, October 2017
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Title
Cupriavidus pinatubonensis AEO106 deals with copper-induced oxidative stress before engaging in biodegradation of the herbicide 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid
Published in
BMC Microbiology, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12866-017-1119-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nanna Bygvraa Svenningsen, Mette Damgaard, Maria Rasmussen, Danilo Pérez-Pantoja, Ole Nybroe, Mette Haubjerg Nicolaisen

Abstract

Microbial degradation of phenoxy acid (PA) herbicides in agricultural soils is important to minimize herbicide leaching to groundwater reservoirs. Degradation may, however, be hampered by exposure of the degrader bacteria to toxic metals as copper (Cu) in the soil environment. Exposure to Cu leads to accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in some bacteria, but it is not known how Cu-derived ROS and an ensuing oxidative stress affect the degradation of PA herbicides. Based on the previously proposed paradigm that bacteria deal with environmental stress before they engage in biodegradation, we studied how the degradation of the PA herbicide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) by the model PA degrader Cupriavidus pinatubonensis AEO106 was affected by Cu exposure. Exposure of C. pinatubonensis in batch culture to sublethal concentrations of Cu increased accumulation of ROS measured by the oxidant sensing probe 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and flow cytometry, and resulted in upregulation of a gene encoding a protein belong to the Ohr/OsmC protein family. The ohr/osmC gene was also highly induced by H2O2 exposure suggesting that it is involved in the oxidative stress response in C. pinatubonensis. The increased ROS accumulation and increased expression of the oxidative stress defense coincided with a delay in the catabolic performance, since both expression of the catabolic tfdA gene and MCPA mineralization were delayed compared to unexposed control cells. The current study suggests that Cu-induced ROS accumulation in C. pinatubonensis activates a stress response involving the product of the ohr/osmC gene. Further, the stress response is launched before induction of the catabolic tfdA gene and mineralization occurs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Unspecified 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,710,300
of 12,077,989 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,400
of 1,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,639
of 284,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#51
of 69 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.