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Nitric Oxide in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Tuberculosis

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
100 Mendeley
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Title
Nitric Oxide in the Pathogenesis and Treatment of Tuberculosis
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, October 2017
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2017.02008
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hamidreza Jamaati, Esmaeil Mortaz, Zeinab Pajouhi, Gert Folkerts, Mehrnaz Movassaghi, Milad Moloudizargari, Ian M. Adcock, Johan Garssen

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is globally known as one of the most important human pathogens. Mtb is estimated to infect nearly one third of the world's population with many subjects having a latent infection. Thus, from an estimated 2 billion people infected with Mtb, less than 10% may develop symptomatic TB. This indicates that the host immune system may constrain pathogen replication in most infected individuals. On entering the lungs of the host, Mtb initially encounters resident alveolar macrophages which can engulf and subsequently eliminate intracellular microbes via a plethora of bactericidal mechanisms including the generation of free radicals such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Nitric oxide (NO), a key anti-mycobacterial molecule, is detected in the exhaled breath of patients infected with Mtb. Recent knowledge regarding the regulatory role of NO in airway function and Mtb proliferation paves the way of exploiting the beneficial effects of this molecule for the treatment of airway diseases. Here, we discuss the importance of NO in the pathogenesis of TB, the diagnostic use of exhaled and urinary NO in Mtb infection and the potential of NO-based treatments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 16%
Student > Master 16 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 8%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 21 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 18 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 6%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 27 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2020.
All research outputs
#9,766,277
of 17,379,776 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#7,253
of 16,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,160
of 329,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#181
of 262 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,379,776 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,486 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 262 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.