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Mediterranean California’s water use future under multiple scenarios of developed and agricultural land use change

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
29 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Mediterranean California’s water use future under multiple scenarios of developed and agricultural land use change
Published in
PLOS ONE, October 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0187181
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tamara S. Wilson, Benjamin M. Sleeter, D. Richard Cameron

Abstract

With growing demand and highly variable inter-annual water supplies, California's water use future is fraught with uncertainty. Climate change projections, anticipated population growth, and continued agricultural intensification, will likely stress existing water supplies in coming decades. Using a state-and-transition simulation modeling approach, we examine a broad suite of spatially explicit future land use scenarios and their associated county-level water use demand out to 2062. We examined a range of potential water demand futures sampled from a 20-year record of historical (1992-2012) data to develop a suite of potential future land change scenarios, including low/high change scenarios for urbanization and agriculture as well as "lowest of the low" and "highest of the high" anthropogenic use. Future water demand decreased 8.3 billion cubic meters (Bm3) in the lowest of the low scenario and decreased 0.8 Bm3 in the low agriculture scenario. The greatest increased water demand was projected for the highest of the high land use scenario (+9.4 Bm3), high agricultural expansion (+4.6 Bm3), and high urbanization (+2.1 Bm3) scenarios. Overall, these scenarios show agricultural land use decisions will likely drive future demand more than increasing municipal and industrial uses, yet improved efficiencies across all sectors could lead to potential water use savings. Results provide water managers with information on diverging land use and water use futures, based on historical, observed land change trends and water use histories.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Other 5 10%
Student > Master 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 31%
Environmental Science 10 21%
Engineering 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,086,486
of 20,998,225 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#15,025
of 179,836 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,807
of 340,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#314
of 2,605 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,998,225 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 179,836 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,015 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,605 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.