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Interaction of quantitative 18 F-FDG-PET-CT imaging parameters and human papillomavirus status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Head & Neck, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Interaction of quantitative 18 F-FDG-PET-CT imaging parameters and human papillomavirus status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma
Published in
Head & Neck, May 2015
DOI 10.1002/hed.23920
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlotte S. Schouten, Sara Hakim, R. Boellaard, Elisabeth Bloemena, Patricia A. Doornaert, Birgit I. Witte, Boudewijn J. M. Braakhuis, Ruud H. Brakenhoff, C. René Leemans, Otto S. Hoekstra, Remco de Bree

Abstract

Background. Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have a better survival than HPV-negative OPSCC. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET-CT) may also provide prognostic information. We evaluated glycolytic characteristics in HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCC. Methods. Forty-four patients underwent pretreatment 18F-FDG-PET-CT. Standardized Uptake Values (SUV) and metabolic active tumor volume (MATV) were determined for primary tumors. HPV-status was determined with p16 immunostaining, followed by high-risk HPV DNA detection on the positive cases. Results. Twenty-seven patients were HPV-positive (61.4%). Median MATV was 2.8 millilitres (ml) [1.6-5.1] for HPV-positive and 6.0 ml [4.4-18.7] for HPV-negative tumors (p<0.001). SUV-values are volume dependent (partial volume effect), therefore, MATV was included as covariate in multivariate analysis. The maximum SUV in HPV-positive was 3.9 units lower than in HPV-negative tumors (p=0.01). Conclusions. 18F-FDG-PET-CT parameters are lower in HPV-positive than in HPV-negative patients. Low pretreatment SUV-values in HPV-positive OPSCC may be at least partly explained by HPV-induced tumor changes. Head Neck, 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 4%
Denmark 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 22%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Unspecified 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 8 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 52%
Unspecified 8 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Mathematics 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2014.
All research outputs
#7,000,120
of 12,182,204 outputs
Outputs from Head & Neck
#584
of 1,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,972
of 227,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Head & Neck
#9
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,182,204 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,788 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.