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Human parainfluenza virus surveillance in pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a special view of parainfluenza type 4

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, September 2018
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Title
Human parainfluenza virus surveillance in pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a special view of parainfluenza type 4
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2017.07.017
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luciano M. Thomazelli, Danielle B. L. de Oliveira, Giuliana S. Durigon, Brett Whitaker, Shifaq Kamili, Eitan N. Berezin, Edison L. Durigon

Abstract

Characterize the role of human parainfluenza virus and its clinical features in Brazilian children under 2 years of age presenting with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Real-time assays were used to identify strains of human parainfluenza virus and other common respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal aspirates. One thousand and two children presenting with acute lower respiratory tract illnesses were enrolled from February 2008 to August 2010. One hundred and four (10.4%) patients were human parainfluenza virus positive, of whom 60 (57.7%) were positive for human parainfluenza virus-3, 30 (28.8%) for human parainfluenza virus-4, 12 (11.5%) for human parainfluenza virus-1, and two (1.9%) for human parainfluenza virus-2. Seven (6.7%) patients had more than one strain of human parainfluenza virus detected. The most frequent symptoms were cough and fever, similar to other viral respiratory infections. Clinical manifestations did not differ significantly between human parainfluenza virus-1, -2, -3, and -4 infections. Human parainfluenza virus-1, -3, and -4 were present in the population studied throughout the three years of surveillance, with human parainfluenza virus-3 being the predominant type identified in the first two years. Human parainfluenza viruses contribute substantially to pediatric acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Brazil, with nearly 30% of this contribution attributable to human parainfluenza virus-4.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Professor 1 3%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 9 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 11 37%