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DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
172 Mendeley
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Title
DoMINO: Donor milk for improved neurodevelopmental outcomes
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2431-14-123
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sharon Unger, Sharyn Gibbins, John Zupancic, Deborah L O’Connor

Abstract

Provision of mother's own milk is the optimal way to feed infants, including very low birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g). Importantly for VLBW infants, who are at elevated risk of neurologic sequelae, mother's own milk has been shown to enhance neurocognitive development. Unfortunately, the majority of mothers of VLBW infants are unable to provide an adequate supply of milk and thus supplementation with formula or donor milk is necessary. Given the association between mother's own milk and neurodevelopment, it is important to ascertain whether provision of human donor milk as a supplement may yield superior neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to formula.Our primary hypothesis is that VLBW infants fed pasteurized donor milk compared to preterm formula as a supplement to mother's own milk for 90 days or until hospital discharge, whichever comes first, will have an improved cognitive outcome as measured at 18 months corrected age on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3(rd) ed. Secondary hypotheses are that the use of pasteurized donor milk will: (1) reduce a composite of death and serious morbidity; (2) support growth; and (3) improve language and motor development. Exploratory research questions include: Will use of pasteurized donor milk: (1) influence feeding tolerance and nutrient intake (2) have an acceptable cost effectiveness from a comprehensive societal perspective?

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 172 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Bangladesh 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 170 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 22%
Researcher 35 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 8%
Student > Bachelor 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 33 19%
Unknown 29 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 72 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 13%
Psychology 10 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 37 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,672,071
of 22,971,207 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#574
of 3,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,687
of 227,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#15
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,971,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,599 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.