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Botulinum toxin-induced facial muscle paralysis affects amygdala responses to the perception of emotional expressions: preliminary findings from an A-B-A design

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Botulinum toxin-induced facial muscle paralysis affects amygdala responses to the perception of emotional expressions: preliminary findings from an A-B-A design
Published in
Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/2045-5380-4-11
Pubmed ID
Authors

M Kim, Maital Neta, F Davis, Erika J Ruberry, Diana Dinescu, Todd F Heatherton, Mitchell A Stotland, Paul J Whalen

Abstract

It has long been suggested that feedback signals from facial muscles influence emotional experience. The recent surge in use of botulinum toxin (BTX) to induce temporary muscle paralysis offers a unique opportunity to directly test this "facial feedback hypothesis." Previous research shows that the lack of facial muscle feedback due to BTX-induced paralysis influences subjective reports of emotional experience, as well as brain activity associated with the imitation of emotional facial expressions. However, it remains to be seen whether facial muscle paralysis affects brain activity, especially the amygdala, which is known to be responsive to the perception of emotion in others. Further, it is unknown whether these neural changes are permanent or whether they revert to their original state after the effects of BTX have subsided. The present study sought to address these questions by using functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural responses to angry and happy facial expressions in the presence or absence of facial paralysis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Master 6 14%
Other 4 10%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 52%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 10%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2019.
All research outputs
#877,667
of 14,150,424 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#9
of 68 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,163
of 233,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,150,424 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,551 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.