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Enhanced Arctic Amplification Began at the Mid-Brunhes Event ~400,000 years ago

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Enhanced Arctic Amplification Began at the Mid-Brunhes Event ~400,000 years ago
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-13821-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. M. Cronin, G. S. Dwyer, E. K. Caverly, J. Farmer, L. H. DeNinno, J. Rodriguez-Lazaro, L. Gemery

Abstract

Arctic Ocean temperatures influence ecosystems, sea ice, species diversity, biogeochemical cycling, seafloor methane stability, deep-sea circulation, and CO2 cycling. Today's Arctic Ocean and surrounding regions are undergoing climatic changes often attributed to "Arctic amplification" - that is, amplified warming in Arctic regions due to sea-ice loss and other processes, relative to global mean temperature. However, the long-term evolution of Arctic amplification is poorly constrained due to lack of continuous sediment proxy records of Arctic Ocean temperature, sea ice cover and circulation. Here we present reconstructions of Arctic Ocean intermediate depth water (AIW) temperatures and sea-ice cover spanning the last ~ 1.5 million years (Ma) of orbitally-paced glacial/interglacial cycles (GIC). Using Mg/Ca paleothermometry of the ostracode Krithe and sea-ice planktic and benthic indicator species, we suggest that the Mid-Brunhes Event (MBE), a major climate transition ~ 400-350 ka, involved fundamental changes in AIW temperature and sea-ice variability. Enhanced Arctic amplification at the MBE suggests a major climate threshold was reached at ~ 400 ka involving Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), inflowing warm Atlantic Layer water, ice sheet, sea-ice and ice-shelf feedbacks, and sensitivity to higher post-MBE interglacial CO2 concentrations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 24%
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Professor 3 6%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 24 44%
Environmental Science 8 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 15 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,979,899
of 15,327,845 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#24,929
of 79,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,488
of 321,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3,846
of 13,293 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,327,845 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,116 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13,293 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.