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How Should Organizations Promote Equitable Distribution of Benefits from Technological Innovation in Health Care?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, November 2017
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29 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
Title
How Should Organizations Promote Equitable Distribution of Benefits from Technological Innovation in Health Care?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, November 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.11.stas1-1711
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Technological innovations typically benefit those who have good access to and an understanding of the underlying technologies. As such, technology-centered health care innovations are likely to preferentially benefit users of privileged socioeconomic backgrounds. Which policies and strategies should health care organizations adopt to promote equitable distribution of the benefits from technological innovations? In this essay, we draw on two important concepts-co-creation (the joint creation of value by multiple parties such as a company and its customers) and digitalization (the application of new digital technologies and the ensuing changes in sociotechnical structures and relationships)-and propose a set of policies and strategies that health care organizations could adopt to ensure that benefits from technological innovations are more equitably distributed among all target populations, including resource-poor communities and individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 8 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 4 20%
Social Sciences 3 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Computer Science 2 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 30%