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Association of psychological distress, quality of life and costs with carpal tunnel syndrome severity: a cross-sectional analysis of the PALMS cohort

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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39 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Association of psychological distress, quality of life and costs with carpal tunnel syndrome severity: a cross-sectional analysis of the PALMS cohort
Published in
BMJ Open, November 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017732
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina Jerosch-Herold, Julie Houghton, Julian Blake, Anum Shaikh, Edward CF Wilson, Lee Shepstone

Abstract

The Prediciting factors for response to treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome (PALMS) study is designed to identify prognostic factors for outcome from corticosteroid injection and surgical decompression for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and predictors of cost over 2 years. The aim of this paper is to explore the cross-sectional association of baseline patient-reported and clinical severity with anxiety, depression, health-related quality of life and costs of CTS in patients referred to secondary care. Prospective, multicentre cohort study initiated in 2013. We collected baseline data on patient-reported symptom severity (CTS-6), psychological status (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), hand function (Michigan Hand Questionnaire) comorbidities, EQ-5D-3L (3-level version of EuroQol-5 dimension) and sociodemographic variables. Nerve conduction tests classified patients into five severity grades (mild to very severe). Data were analysed using a general linear model. 753 patients with CTS provided complete baseline data. Multivariable linear regression adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, duration of CTS, smoking status, alcohol consumption, employment status, body mass index and comorbidities showed a highly statistically significant relationship between CTS-6 and anxiety, depression and the EQ-5D (p<0.0001 in each case). Likewise, a significant relationship was observed between electrodiagnostic severity and anxiety (p=0.027) but not with depression (p=0.986) or the EQ-5D (p=0.257). National Health Service (NHS) and societal costs in the 3 months prior to enrolment were significantly associated with self-reported severity (p<0.0001) but not with electrodiagnostic severity. Patient-reported symptom severity in CTS is significantly and positively associated with anxiety, depression, health-related quality of life, and NHS and societal costs even when adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, smoking, drinking and occupational status. In contrast, there is little or no evidence of any relationship with objectively derived CTS severity. Future research is needed to understand the impact of approaches and treatments that address psychosocial stressors as well as biomedical factors on relief of symptoms from carpal tunnel syndrome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Master 12 14%
Researcher 11 13%
Other 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Other 21 24%
Unknown 13 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 17%
Psychology 11 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 15 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2018.
All research outputs
#775,160
of 15,551,009 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#1,597
of 14,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,253
of 322,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#67
of 597 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,551,009 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,095 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,325 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 597 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.