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Effect of aerobic exercise on hippocampal volume in humans: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 10,924)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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194 Dimensions

Readers on

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513 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of aerobic exercise on hippocampal volume in humans: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
NeuroImage, February 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.11.007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph Firth, Brendon Stubbs, Davy Vancampfort, Felipe Schuch, Jim Lagopoulos, Simon Rosenbaum, Philip B. Ward

Abstract

Hippocampal volume increase in response to aerobic exercise has been consistently observed in animal models. However, the evidence from human studies is equivocal. We undertook a systematic review to identify all controlled trials examining the effect of aerobic exercise on the hippocampal volumes in humans, and applied meta-analytic techniques to determine if aerobic exercise resulted in volumetric increases. We also sought to establish how volume changes differed in relation to unilateral measures of left/right hippocampal volume, and across the lifespan. A systematic search identified 4398 articles, of which 14 were eligible for inclusion in the primary analysis. A random-effects meta-analysis showed no significant effect of aerobic exercise on total hippocampal volume across the 737 participants. However, aerobic exercise had significant positive effects on left hippocampal volume in comparison to control conditions. Post-hoc analyses indicated effects were driven through exercise preventing the volumetric decreases which occur over time. These results provide meta-analytic evidence for exercise-induced volumetric retention in the left hippocampus. Aerobic exercise interventions may be useful for preventing age-related hippocampal deterioration and maintaining neuronal health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 480 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 513 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 513 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 81 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 16%
Student > Master 67 13%
Researcher 47 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 33 6%
Other 92 18%
Unknown 113 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 77 15%
Psychology 71 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 60 12%
Sports and Recreations 48 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 6%
Other 71 14%
Unknown 157 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 689. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2022.
All research outputs
#19,602
of 20,110,162 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage
#5
of 10,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#515
of 337,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage
#2
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,110,162 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,924 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,857 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.