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Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, January 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#27 of 900)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
48 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
272 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
269 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, January 2002
DOI 10.1186/1475-2840-1-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Doron Aronson, Elliot J Rayfield

Abstract

Both type I and type II diabetes are powerful and independent risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Atherosclerosis accounts for virtually 80% of all deaths among diabetic patients. Prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia is now recognized a major factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in diabetes. Hyperglycemia induces a large number of alterations at the cellular level of vascular tissue that potentially accelerate the atherosclerotic process. Animal and human studies have elucidated three major mechanisms that encompass most of the pathological alterations observed in the diabetic vasculature: 1) Nonenzymatic glycosylation of proteins and lipids which can interfere with their normal function by disrupting molecular conformation, alter enzymatic activity, reduce degradative capacity, and interfere with receptor recognition. In addition, glycosylated proteins interact with a specific receptor present on all cells relevant to the atherosclerotic process, including monocyte-derived macrophages, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. The interaction of glycosylated proteins with their receptor results in the induction of oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses 2) oxidative stress 3) protein kinase C (PKC) activation with subsequent alteration in growth factor expression. Importantly, these mechanisms may be interrelated. For example, hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress promotes both the formation of advanced glycosylation end products and PKC activation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 269 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 261 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 48 18%
Student > Master 46 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 16%
Researcher 24 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 9%
Other 58 22%
Unknown 26 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 90 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 57 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 11%
Engineering 10 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 3%
Other 42 16%
Unknown 32 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2020.
All research outputs
#738,708
of 15,872,836 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#27
of 900 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,808
of 235,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#1
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,872,836 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 900 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,512 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.