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The val158met Polymorphism of Human Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Affects Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activation in Response to Painful Laser Stimulation

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 464)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The val158met Polymorphism of Human Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Affects Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activation in Response to Painful Laser Stimulation
Published in
Molecular Pain, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1744-8069-6-32
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arian Mobascher, Juergen Brinkmeyer, Holger Thiele, Mohammad R Toliat, Michael Steffens, Tracy Warbrick, Francesco Musso, Hans-Joerg Wittsack, Andreas Saleh, Alfons Schnitzler, Georg Winterer

Abstract

Pain is a complex experience with sensory, emotional and cognitive aspects. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to pain-related phenotypes such as chronic pain states. Genetic variations in the gene coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) have been suggested to affect clinical and experimental pain-related phenotypes including regional mu-opioid system responses to painful stimulation as measured by ligand-PET (positron emission tomography). The functional val158met single nucleotide polymorphism has been most widely studied. However, apart from its impact on pain-induced opioid release the effect of this genetic variation on cerebral pain processing has not been studied with activation measures such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), PET or electroencephalography. In the present fMRI study we therefore sought to investigate the impact of the COMT val158met polymorphism on the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to painful laser stimulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
United Kingdom 2 4%
Spain 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 48 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 36%
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Master 6 11%
Professor 6 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 29%
Psychology 11 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 18%
Neuroscience 7 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2015.
All research outputs
#999,684
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#16
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,432
of 230,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,917 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.