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Mechanocaloric effects in superionic thin films from atomistic simulations

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
Mechanocaloric effects in superionic thin films from atomistic simulations
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-01081-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arun K. Sagotra, Daniel Errandonea, Claudio Cazorla

Abstract

Solid-state cooling is an energy-efficient and scalable refrigeration technology that exploits the adiabatic variation of a crystalline order parameter under an external field (electric, magnetic, or mechanic). The mechanocaloric effect bears one of the greatest cooling potentials in terms of energy efficiency owing to its large available latent heat. Here we show that giant mechanocaloric effects occur in thin films of well-known families of fast-ion conductors, namely Li-rich (Li3OCl) and type-I (AgI), an abundant class of materials that routinely are employed in electrochemistry cells. Our simulations reveal that at room temperature AgI undergoes an adiabatic temperature shift of 38 K under a biaxial stress of 1 GPa. Likewise, Li3OCl displays a cooling capacity of 9 K under similar mechanical conditions although at a considerably higher temperature. We also show that ionic vacancies have a detrimental effect on the cooling performance of superionic thin films. Our findings should motivate experimental mechanocaloric searches in a wide variety of already known superionic materials.Mechanocaloric effects are a promising path towards solid-state cooling. Here the authors perform atomistic simulations on the well-known fast-ion conductor silver iodide and computationally predict a sizeable mechanocaloric effect under biaxial strain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 26%
Student > Master 4 17%
Researcher 3 13%
Lecturer 1 4%
Professor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Materials Science 7 30%
Physics and Astronomy 3 13%
Engineering 3 13%
Chemistry 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2019.
All research outputs
#2,320,303
of 14,498,614 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#16,518
of 27,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,341
of 319,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1,394
of 2,180 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,498,614 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 27,244 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,291 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,180 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.