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A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of crew resource management training in acute care domains

Overview of attention for article published in Postgraduate Medical Journal, November 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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50 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of crew resource management training in acute care domains
Published in
Postgraduate Medical Journal, November 2014
DOI 10.1136/postgradmedj-2014-132800
Pubmed ID
Authors

Angela O'Dea, Paul O'Connor, Ivan Keogh

Abstract

The healthcare industry has seen an increase in the adoption of team training, such as crew resource management (CRM), to improve teamwork and coordination within acute care medical teams. A meta-analysis was carried out in order to quantify the effects of CRM training on reactions, learning, behaviour and clinical care outcomes. Biases in the research evidence are identified and recommendations for training development and evaluation are presented. PUBMED, EMBASE and PsychInfo were systematically searched for all relevant papers. Peer reviewed papers published in English between January 1985 and September 2013, which present empirically based studies focusing on interventions to improve team effectiveness in acute health care domains, were included. A total of 20 CRM-type team training evaluation studies were found to fulfil the a priori criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Overall, CRM trained participants responded positively to CRM (mean score 4.25 out of a maximum of 5), the training had large effects on participants' knowledge (d=1.05), a small effect on attitudes (d=0.22) and a large effect on behaviours (d=1.25). There was insufficient evidence to support an effect on clinical care outcomes or long term impacts. The findings support the premise that CRM training can positively impact teamwork in healthcare and provide estimates of the expected effects of training. However, there is a need for greater precision in outcome assessment, improved standardisation of methods and measures, and more robust research design. Stronger evidence of effectiveness will require multi-level, multicentre, multispecialty and longitudinal studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 94 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 15%
Researcher 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 9 9%
Other 23 23%
Unknown 15 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 15%
Psychology 12 12%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 4%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 16 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,452,925
of 12,362,061 outputs
Outputs from Postgraduate Medical Journal
#1,292
of 1,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,580
of 229,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Postgraduate Medical Journal
#19
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,362,061 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,841 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,413 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.