↓ Skip to main content

Relationship between Intervention Dose and Outcomes in Living Well with Diabetes—A Randomized Trial of a Telephone-Delivered Lifestyle-Based Weight Loss Intervention

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Health Promotion, November 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
141 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Relationship between Intervention Dose and Outcomes in Living Well with Diabetes—A Randomized Trial of a Telephone-Delivered Lifestyle-Based Weight Loss Intervention
Published in
American Journal of Health Promotion, November 2015
DOI 10.4278/ajhp.140206-quan-62
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana D. Goode, Elisabeth A. H. Winkler, Marina M. Reeves, Elizabeth G. Eakin

Abstract

Abstract Purpose . To examine associations of intervention dose with weight, physical activity, glycemic control, and diet outcomes in a randomized trial of a telephone counseling intervention. Design . Study design was a secondary analysis of intervention group. Setting . Study setting was primary care practices in a disadvantaged community in Australia. Subjects . Participants were adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 151). Intervention . Up to 27 telephone counseling calls were made during 18 months. Measures . Intervention dose was assessed as the number of calls completed (in tertile categories). Primary outcomes were weight and HbA1c, and moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity via accelerometer. Secondary outcomes were dietary energy intake and diet quality via a validated questionnaire. Analysis . Analyses employed were bivariate associations of call completion with sociodemographics, and confounder-adjusted linear mixed models for associations of call completion with outcomes (multiple imputation of missing data). Results . Only previous diagnosis of depression/anxiety had a statistically significant (p = .008) association with call completion. Call completion was significantly associated with weight loss (p < .001) but not the other outcomes (p > .05). Relative to low call completion, mean weight loss (as a percentage of baseline weight) was greater in the high-call completion group by -3.3% (95% confidence interval, -5.0% to -1.5%). Conclusion . Increased dose of intervention was associated with greater weight loss. More needs to be done to retain patients for the duration of weight loss and behavior change interventions, particularly those with diabetes and comorbid depression, who were the most difficult to engage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 141 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 18%
Student > Master 26 18%
Researcher 22 16%
Unspecified 21 15%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Other 28 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 32 23%
Unspecified 26 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 11%
Social Sciences 14 10%
Other 30 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2014.
All research outputs
#7,853,991
of 12,517,134 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Health Promotion
#669
of 872 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,872
of 231,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Health Promotion
#4
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 872 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.