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Sources of endocrine disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: A geographic information systems approach

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, November 2014
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Title
Sources of endocrine disrupting compounds in North Carolina waterways: A geographic information systems approach
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, November 2014
DOI 10.1002/etc.2797
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sackett, Dana K., Pow, Crystal Lee, Rubino, Matthew J., Aday, D. Derek, Cope, W. Gregory, Kullman, Seth, Rice, James A., Kwak, Thomas J., Law, Mac, Sackett DK, Pow CL, Rubino MJ, Aday DD, Cope WG, Kullman S, Rice JA, Kwak TJ, Law M

Abstract

The presence of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), particularly estrogenic compounds, in the environment has drawn public attention across the globe, yet a clear understanding of the extent and distribution of estrogenic EDCs in surface waters and their relationship to potential sources is lacking. The objective of the present study was to identify and examine the potential input of estrogenic EDC sources in North Carolina water bodies using a geographic information system (GIS) mapping and analysis approach. Existing data from state and federal agencies were used to create point and nonpoint source maps depicting the cumulative contribution of potential sources of estrogenic EDCs to North Carolina surface waters. Water was collected from 33 sites (12 associated with potential point sources, 12 associated with potential nonpoint sources, and 9 reference), to validate the predictive results of the GIS analysis. Estrogenicity (measured as 17β-estradiol equivalence) ranged from 0.06 ng/L to 56.9 ng/L. However, the majority of sites (88%) had water 17β-estradiol concentrations below 1 ng/L. Sites associated with point and nonpoint sources had significantly higher 17β-estradiol levels than reference sites. The results suggested that water 17β-estradiol was reflective of GIS predictions, confirming the relevance of landscape-level influences on water quality and validating the GIS approach to characterize such relationships. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;9999:1-9. © 2014 SETAC.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 41%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 35%
Environmental Science 4 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 3 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2014.
All research outputs
#5,333,391
of 6,272,959 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#553
of 728 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,339
of 161,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#21
of 29 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 728 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.