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PREVALENCE AND SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIATION OF AN ALOPECIA SYNDROME IN POLAR BEARS ( URSUS MARITIMUS ) OF THE SOUTHERN BEAUFORT SEA

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Wildlife Diseases, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 724)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
PREVALENCE AND SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIATION OF AN ALOPECIA SYNDROME IN POLAR BEARS ( URSUS MARITIMUS ) OF THE SOUTHERN BEAUFORT SEA
Published in
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, January 2015
DOI 10.7589/2013-11-301
Pubmed ID
Authors

Todd Atwood, Elizabeth Peacock, Kathy Burek-Huntington, Valerie Shearn-Bochsler, Barbara Bodenstein, Kimberlee Beckmen, George Durner

Abstract

Abstract Alopecia (hair loss) has been observed in several marine mammal species and has potential energetic consequences for sustaining a normal core body temperature, especially for Arctic marine mammals routinely exposed to harsh environmental conditions. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) rely on a thick layer of adipose tissue and a dense pelage to ameliorate convective heat loss while moving between sea ice and open water. From 1998 to 2012, we observed an alopecia syndrome in polar bears from the southern Beaufort Sea of Alaska that presented as bilaterally asymmetrical loss of guard hairs and thinning of the undercoat around the head, neck, and shoulders, which, in severe cases, was accompanied by exudation and crusted skin lesions. Alopecia was observed in 49 (3.45%) of the bears sampled during 1,421 captures, and the apparent prevalence varied by years with peaks occurring in 1999 (16%) and 2012 (28%). The probability that a bear had alopecia was greatest for subadults and for bears captured in the Prudhoe Bay region, and alopecic individuals had a lower body condition score than unaffected individuals. The cause of the syndrome remains unknown and future work should focus on identifying the causative agent and potential effects on population vital rates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 55 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 18 32%
Researcher 12 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Master 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 42%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2015.
All research outputs
#392,217
of 12,618,609 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#11
of 724 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,992
of 231,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Wildlife Diseases
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,618,609 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 724 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,198 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them