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Liver cystic echinococcosis and human host immune and autoimmune follow-up: A review

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Hepatology, October 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Liver cystic echinococcosis and human host immune and autoimmune follow-up: A review
Published in
World Journal of Hepatology, October 2017
DOI 10.4254/wjh.v9.i30.1176
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikica M Grubor, Katica D Jovanova-Nesic, Yehuda Shoenfeld

Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an infectious disease caused by the larvae of parasite Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus). To successfully establish an infection, parasite release some substances and molecules that can modulate host immune functions, stimulating a strong anti-inflammatory reaction to carry favor to host and to reserve self-survival in the host. The literature was reviewed using MEDLINE, and an open access search for immunology of hydatidosis was performed. Accumulating data from animal experiments and human studies provided us with exciting insights into the mechanisms involved that affect all parts of immunity. In this review we used the existing scientific data and discuss how these findings assisted with a better understanding of the immunology of E. granulosus infection in man. The aim of this study is to point the several facts that challenge immune and autoimmune responses to protect E. granulosus from elimination and to minimize host severe pathology. Understanding the immune mechanisms of E. granulosus infection in an intermediate human host will provide, we believe, a more useful treatment with immunomodulating molecules and possibly better protection from parasitic infections. Besides that, the diagnosis of CE has improved due to the application of a new molecular tool for parasite identification by using of new recombinant antigens and immunogenic peptides. More studies for the better understanding of the mechanisms of parasite immune evasion is necessary. It will enable a novel approach in protection, detection and improving of the host inflammatory responses. In contrast, according to the "hygiene hypothesis", clinical applications that decrease the incidence of infection in developed countries and recently in developing countries are at the origin of the increasing incidence of both allergic and autoimmune diseases. Thus, an understanding of the immune mechanisms of E. granulosus infection is extremely important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Lecturer 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 13 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 17 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,278,075
of 12,124,842 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Hepatology
#129
of 348 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,972
of 285,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Hepatology
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,124,842 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 348 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,047 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.