↓ Skip to main content

A retrospective examination of mean relative telomere length in the Tasmanian Familial Hematological Malignancies Study

Overview of attention for article published in Oncology Reports, October 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A retrospective examination of mean relative telomere length in the Tasmanian Familial Hematological Malignancies Study
Published in
Oncology Reports, October 2014
DOI 10.3892/or.2014.3568
Pubmed ID
Authors

NICHOLAS B. BLACKBURN, JAC C. CHARLESWORTH, JAMES R. MARTHICK, ELIZABETH M. TEGG, KATHERINE A. MARSDEN, VELANDAI SRIKANTH, JOHN BLANGERO, RAY M. LOWENTHAL, SIMON J. FOOTE, JOANNE L. DICKINSON

Abstract

Telomere length has a biological link to cancer, with excessive telomere shortening leading to genetic instability and resultant malignant transformation. Telomere length is heritable and genetic variants determining telomere length have been identified. Telomere biology has been implicated in the development of hematological malignancies (HMs), therefore, closer examination of telomere length in HMs may provide further insight into genetic etiology of disease development and support for telomere length as a prognostic factor in HMs. We retrospectively examined mean relative telomere length in the Tasmanian Familial Hematological Malignancies Study using a quantitative PCR method on genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples. Fifty-five familial HM cases, 191 unaffected relatives of familial HM cases and 75 non-familial HM cases were compared with 758 population controls. Variance components modeling was employed to identify factors influencing variation in telomere length. Overall, HM cases had shorter mean relative telomere length (p=2.9×10-6) and this was observed across both familial and non-familial HM cases (p=2.2x10-4 and 2.2x10-5, respectively) as well as additional subgroupings of HM cases according to broad subtypes. Mean relative telomere length was also significantly heritable (62.6%; p=4.7x10-5) in the HM families in the present study. We present new evidence of significantly shorter mean relative telomere length in both familial and non-familial HM cases from the same population adding further support to the potential use of telomere length as a prognostic factor in HMs. Whether telomere shortening is the cause of or the result of HMs is yet to be determined, but as telomere length was found to be highly heritable in our HM families this suggests that genetics driving the variation in telomere length is related to HM disease risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 40%
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Master 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Unknown 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Mathematics 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2014.
All research outputs
#10,648,000
of 13,383,064 outputs
Outputs from Oncology Reports
#952
of 2,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,686
of 235,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncology Reports
#29
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,383,064 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,186 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.