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Mortality benefits of population-wide adherence to national physical activity guidelines: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Epidemiology, November 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Mortality benefits of population-wide adherence to national physical activity guidelines: a prospective cohort study
Published in
European Journal of Epidemiology, November 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10654-014-9965-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gráinne Long, Clare Watkinson, Søren Brage, Jerry Morris, Bill Tuxworth, Peter Fentem, Simon Griffin, Rebecca Simmons, Nicholas Wareham

Abstract

We quantified the mortality benefits and attributable fractions associated with engaging in physical activity across a range of levels, including those recommended by national guidelines. Data were from the Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey, a population-based prospective cohort comprising 1,796 male and 2,122 female participants aged 16-96 years, randomly selected from 30 English constituencies in 1990. Participants were tagged for mortality at the Office for National Statistics. Cox multivariable regression quantified the association between self-reported achievement of activity guidelines-150 min of at least moderate activity per week, equivalent here to 30 or more 20-min episodes of at least moderate activity per month-and mortality adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, social class, geographical area, anxiety/depression and interview season. There were 1,175 deaths over a median (IQR) of 22.9 (3.9) years follow-up; a mortality rate of 15.2, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 14.4-16.1 per 1,000 person years. Compared with being inactive (no 20-min bouts per month), meeting activity guidelines (30+ bouts) was associated with a 25 % lower mortality rate, adjusting for measured confounders. If everyone adhered to recommended-, or even low-activity levels, a substantial proportion of premature mortality might be avoided (PAF, 95 % CI 20.6, 6.9-32.3 and 8.9, 4.2-13.4 %, respectively). Among a representative English population, adherence to activity guidelines was associated with significantly reduced mortality. Efforts to increase population-wide activity levels could produce large public health benefits and should remain a focus of health promotion efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 3%
India 1 1%
Russia 1 1%
Unknown 69 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 14%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Other 23 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 33%
Unspecified 14 19%
Psychology 9 12%
Sports and Recreations 6 8%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,883,604
of 13,293,718 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Epidemiology
#324
of 1,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,703
of 232,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Epidemiology
#7
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,293,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,934 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.