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Cost-effectiveness of personal tailored risk information and taster sessions to increase the uptake of the NHS stop smoking services: the Start2quit randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Cost-effectiveness of personal tailored risk information and taster sessions to increase the uptake of the NHS stop smoking services: the Start2quit randomized controlled trial
Published in
Addiction, December 2017
DOI 10.1111/add.14086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qi Wu, Hazel Gilbert, Irwin Nazareth, Stephen Sutton, Richard Morris, Irene Petersen, Simon Galton, Steve Parrott

Abstract

To assess the cost-effectiveness of a two-component intervention designed to increase attendance at the NHS Stop Smoking Services (SSSs) in England. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomised controlled trial (Start2quit). NHS SSS and general practices in England. The study comprised 4,384 smokers aged 16 or over identified from medical records in 99 participating practices, who were motivated to quit and had not attended the SSS in the previous 12 months. Intervention was a personalised and tailored letter sent from the General Practitioner (GP), and a personal invitation and appointment to attend a taster session providing information about SSS. Control was a standard generic letter from the GP advertising SSS and asking smokers to contact the service to make an appointment. Costs measured from an NHS/Personal Social Services perspective. Estimated health gains in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) measured with EQ-5D. Incremental cost per QALY gained over six-month and over a lifetime horizon. During the trial period, the adjusted mean difference in costs was £92 (95% CI: -£32-£216) and the adjusted mean difference in QALY gains was 0.002 (95% CI: -0.001-0.004). This generates an incremental cost per QALY gained of £59,401. The probability that the tailored letter and taster session is more cost-effective than the generic letter at six-month is never above 50%. In contrast, the discounted lifetime health care cost was lower in the intervention group while the lifetime QALY gains were significantly higher. The probability that the intervention is more cost-effective is over 83% using a £20,000-£30,000 per QALY gained decision-making threshold. An intervention designed to increase attendance at the NHS Stop Smoking Services (tailored letter and taster session in the services) appears less likely to be cost-effective than a generic letter in the short-term but is likely to become more cost-effective than the generic letter in the long term.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 30%
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Professor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Psychology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,925,117
of 13,597,380 outputs
Outputs from Addiction
#1
of 1 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,836
of 314,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction
#4
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,597,380 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.0. This one scored the same or higher as 0 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.