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Climate change and long‐term fire management impacts on A ustralian savannas

Overview of attention for article published in New Phytologist, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
131 Mendeley
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Title
Climate change and long‐term fire management impacts on A ustralian savannas
Published in
New Phytologist, November 2014
DOI 10.1111/nph.13130
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Scheiter, Steven I. Higgins, Jason Beringer, Lindsay B. Hutley

Abstract

Tropical savannas cover a large proportion of the Earth's land surface and many people are dependent on the ecosystem services that savannas supply. Their sustainable management is crucial. Owing to the complexity of savanna vegetation dynamics, climate change and land use impacts on savannas are highly uncertain. We used a dynamic vegetation model, the adaptive dynamic global vegetation model (aDGVM), to project how climate change and fire management might influence future vegetation in northern Australian savannas. Under future climate conditions, vegetation can store more carbon than under ambient conditions. Changes in rainfall seasonality influence future carbon storage but do not turn vegetation into a carbon source, suggesting that CO2 fertilization is the main driver of vegetation change. The application of prescribed fires with varying return intervals and burning season influences vegetation and fire impacts. Carbon sequestration is maximized with early dry season fires and long fire return intervals, while grass productivity is maximized with late dry season fires and intermediate fire return intervals. The study has implications for management policy across Australian savannas because it identifies how fire management strategies may influence grazing yield, carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions. This knowledge is crucial to maintaining important ecosystem services of Australian savannas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 131 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 123 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 18%
Student > Master 18 14%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Professor 7 5%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 25 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 52 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 29 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2015.
All research outputs
#9,637,433
of 17,471,368 outputs
Outputs from New Phytologist
#5,362
of 7,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,156
of 238,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New Phytologist
#70
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,471,368 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,054 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,389 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.