↓ Skip to main content

Hypomethylation and overexpression of ITGAL (CD11a) in CD4(+) T cells in systemic sclerosis.

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, November 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Hypomethylation and overexpression of ITGAL (CD11a) in CD4(+) T cells in systemic sclerosis.
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1868-7083-6-25
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The pathogenesis and etiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc) are complex and poorly understood. To date, several studies have demonstrated that the activation of the immune system undoubtedly plays a pivotal role in SSc pathogenesis. Activated immune effector T cells contribute to the release of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and drive the SSc-specific autoantibody responses. This, and a profibrotic environment, are all-important components of abnormal active immune responses that can lead to pathological disorders of SSc. CD11a is essential to inflammatory and immune responses, regulating adhesive and co-stimulatory interactions between CD4(+) T cells and other cells. Although CD11a is overexpressed in SSc patients, the mechanisms leading to this overexpression and its consequences remain unclear. DNA methylation, a main epigenetic modification, plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. This work aims to investigate the effect of DNA demethylation on CD11a expression in SSc CD4(+) T cells and to determine its functional significance. CD11a expression was measured using RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Bisulfite sequencing was used to determine the methylation status of the CD11a regulatory region. CD4(+) T cells were co-cultured with antigen-presenting cells, B cells, or fibroblasts with and without anti-CD11a, and proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, IgG production by B cells, and expression levels of COL1A2 mRNA by fibroblasts were evaluated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Master 4 22%
Student > Postgraduate 3 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2014.
All research outputs
#1,821,337
of 4,540,307 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#127
of 209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,964
of 123,815 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#8
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,540,307 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 209 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,815 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.