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Role of Dysregulated Cytokine Signaling and Bacterial Triggers in the Pathogenesis of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Investigative Dermatology, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Role of Dysregulated Cytokine Signaling and Bacterial Triggers in the Pathogenesis of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
Published in
Journal of Investigative Dermatology, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jid.2017.10.028
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melania H. Fanok, Amy Sun, Laura K. Fogli, Vijay Narendran, Miriam Eckstein, Kasthuri Kannan, Igor Dolgalev, Charalampos Lazaris, Adriana Heguy, Mary E. Laird, Mark S. Sundrud, Cynthia Liu, Jeff Kutok, Rodrigo S. Lacruz, Jo-Ann Latkowski, Iannis Aifantis, Niels Ødum, Kenneth B. Hymes, Swati Goel, Sergei B. Koralov

Abstract

Cutaneous T cell lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of lymphomas characterized by the accumulation of malignant T cells in the skin. The molecular and cellular etiology of this malignancy remains enigmatic and what role antigenic stimulation plays in the initiation and/or progression of the disease remains to be elucidated. Deep sequencing of the tumor genome revealed a highly heterogeneous landscape of genetic perturbations and transcriptome analysis of transformed T cells further highlighted the heterogeneity of this disease. Nonetheless, using data harvested from high-throughput transcriptional profiling allowed us to develop a reliable signature of this malignancy. Focusing on a key cytokine signaling pathway, previously implicated in CTCL pathogenesis, JAK/STAT signaling, we used conditional gene targeting to develop a fully penetrant small animal model of this disease that recapitulates many key features of mycosis fungoides, a common variant of CTCL. Using this mouse model, we demonstrate that T cell receptor engagement is critical for malignant transformation of the T lymphocytes and that progression of the disease is dependent on microbiota.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 56 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Student > Master 6 11%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 14 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 19 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2019.
All research outputs
#5,386,882
of 20,578,537 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Investigative Dermatology
#2,545
of 8,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,205
of 335,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Investigative Dermatology
#38
of 118 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,578,537 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,154 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,722 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 118 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.