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Substantial fibrin amyloidogenesis in type 2 diabetes assessed using amyloid-selective fluorescent stains

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 828)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
29 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
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Title
Substantial fibrin amyloidogenesis in type 2 diabetes assessed using amyloid-selective fluorescent stains
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12933-017-0624-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Etheresia Pretorius, Martin J. Page, Lize Engelbrecht, Graham C. Ellis, Douglas B. Kell

Abstract

We have previously shown that many chronic, inflammatory diseases are accompanied, and possibly partly caused or exacerbated, by various coagulopathies, manifested as anomalous clots in the form of 'dense matted deposits'. More recently, we have shown that these clots can be amyloid in nature, and that the plasma of healthy controls can be induced to form such clots by the addition of tiny amounts of bacterial lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is also accompanied by raised levels of LPS. We use superresolution and confocal microscopies to investigate the amyloid nature of clots from healthy and T2D individuals. We show here, with the established stain thioflavin T and the novel stains Amytracker™ 480 and 680, that the clotting of plasma from type 2 diabetics is also amyloid in nature, and that this may be prevented by the addition of suitable concentrations of LPS-binding protein. This implies strongly that there is indeed a microbial component to the development of type 2 diabetes, and suggests that LBP might be used as treatment for it and its sequelae.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 19%
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 19%
Engineering 2 13%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2019.
All research outputs
#999,400
of 13,995,172 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#47
of 828 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,253
of 315,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#9
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,995,172 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 828 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,157 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.