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100 articles every ecologist should read

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 385)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
1250 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
357 Mendeley
Title
100 articles every ecologist should read
Published in
Nature Ecology & Evolution, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41559-017-0370-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Franck Courchamp, Corey J. A. Bradshaw

Abstract

Reading scientific articles is a valuable and major part of the activity of scientists. Yet, with the upsurge of currently available articles and the increasing specialization of scientists, it becomes difficult to identify, let alone read, important papers covering topics not directly related to one's own specific field of research, or that are older than a few years. Our objective was to propose a list of seminal papers deemed to be of major importance in ecology, thus providing a general 'must-read' list for any new ecologist, regardless of particular topic or expertise. We generated a list of 544 papers proposed by 147 ecology experts (journal editorial members) and subsequently ranked via random-sample voting by 368 of 665 contacted ecology experts, covering 6 article types, 6 approaches and 17 fields. Most of the recommended papers were not published in the highest-ranking journals, nor did they have the highest number of mean annual citations. The articles proposed through the collective recommendation of several hundred experienced researchers probably do not represent an 'ultimate', invariant list, but they certainly contain many high-quality articles that are undoubtedly worth reading-regardless of the specific field of interest in ecology-to foster the understanding, knowledge and inspiration of early-career scientists.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,250 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 357 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 357 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 97 27%
Researcher 72 20%
Student > Master 71 20%
Student > Bachelor 29 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 6%
Other 65 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 208 58%
Environmental Science 89 25%
Unspecified 27 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 2%
Other 9 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 895. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2017.
All research outputs
#2,664
of 8,779,653 outputs
Outputs from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#11
of 385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129
of 205,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#3
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,779,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 139.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.