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Mapping multiple components of malaria risk for improved targeting of elimination interventions

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
36 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
72 Mendeley
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Title
Mapping multiple components of malaria risk for improved targeting of elimination interventions
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2106-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Justin M. Cohen, Arnaud Le Menach, Emilie Pothin, Thomas P. Eisele, Peter W. Gething, Philip A. Eckhoff, Bruno Moonen, Allan Schapira, David L. Smith

Abstract

There is a long history of considering the constituent components of malaria risk and the malaria transmission cycle via the use of mathematical models, yet strategic planning in endemic countries tends not to take full advantage of available disease intelligence to tailor interventions. National malaria programmes typically make operational decisions about where to implement vector control and surveillance activities based upon simple categorizations of annual parasite incidence. With technological advances, an enormous opportunity exists to better target specific malaria interventions to the places where they will have greatest impact by mapping and evaluating metrics related to a variety of risk components, each of which describes a different facet of the transmission cycle. Here, these components and their implications for operational decision-making are reviewed. For each component, related mappable malaria metrics are also described which may be measured and evaluated by malaria programmes seeking to better understand the determinants of malaria risk. Implementing tailored programmes based on knowledge of the heterogeneous distribution of the drivers of malaria transmission rather than only consideration of traditional metrics such as case incidence has the potential to result in substantial improvements in decision-making. As programmes improve their ability to prioritize their available tools to the places where evidence suggests they will be most effective, elimination aspirations may become increasingly feasible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 36 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 22%
Researcher 15 21%
Student > Master 13 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 5 7%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 17%
Computer Science 5 7%
Mathematics 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Other 18 25%
Unknown 13 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#947,184
of 15,797,421 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#172
of 4,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,513
of 320,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#31
of 491 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,797,421 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,479 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,232 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 491 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.