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Expanding malaria diagnosis and treatment in Lao PDR: lessons learned from a public–private mix initiative

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
Expanding malaria diagnosis and treatment in Lao PDR: lessons learned from a public–private mix initiative
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2104-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nouannipha Simmalavong, Sengkham Phommixay, Phoudaliphone Kongmanivong, Odai Sichanthongthip, Bouasy Hongvangthong, Deyer Gopinath, David M. Sintasath

Abstract

As in other countries of the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS), the private health sector constitutes a significant avenue where malaria services are provided and presents a unique opportunity for public-private collaboration. In September 2008, a public-private mix (PPM) strategy was launched initially in four northern and southern provinces in Lao PDR to increase access to rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), improve quality of care, and collect routine malaria data from the private sector. Throughout the process, key stakeholders were involved in the planning, monitoring and supervision of project sites. Following an initial assessment in 2009, the PPM initiative expanded to an additional 14 district sites to a total of 245 private pharmacies and 16 clinics covering 8 provinces and 22 districts. By June 2016, a total of 317 pharmacies, 30 clinics in 32 districts of the 8 provinces were participating in the PPM network and reported monthly malaria case data. This descriptive study documented the process of initiating and maintaining the PPM network in Lao PDR. Epidemiological data reported through the routine surveillance system from January 2009 to June 2016 were analyzed to illustrate the contribution of case reporting from the private sector. A total of 2,301,676 malaria tests were performed in the PPM districts, which included all the PPM pharmacies and clinics (176,224, 7.7%), proportion of patients tested from 14,102 (4.6%) in 2009 to 29,554 (10.4%) in 2015. Over the same period of 90 months, a total of 246,091 positive cases (10.7%) were detected in PPM pharmacies and clinics (33,565; 13.6%), in the same districts as the PPM sites. The results suggest that the PPM sites contributed to a significant increasing proportion of patients positive for malaria from 1687 (7.4%) in 2009 to 5697 (15.8%) in 2015. Ensuring adequate and timely supplies of RDTs and ACT to PPM sites is critical. Frequent refresher training is necessary to maintain data quality, motivation and feedback. In the context of malaria elimination, the PPM initiative should be expanded further to ensure that all febrile cases seen through the private sector in malaria transmission areas are tested for malaria and treated appropriately. Results from the PPM must be integrated into a centralized registry of malaria cases that should prompt required case and foci investigations and responses to be conducted as part of elimination efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 26%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,133,490
of 12,145,106 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,690
of 3,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,590
of 281,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#71
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,145,106 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,546 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,139 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.