↓ Skip to main content

No association between the progesterone receptor gene polymorphism (+331G/a) and the risk of breast cancer: an updated meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genetics, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
No association between the progesterone receptor gene polymorphism (+331G/a) and the risk of breast cancer: an updated meta-analysis
Published in
BMC Medical Genetics, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12881-017-0487-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xing-ling Qi, Jun Yao, Yong Zhang

Abstract

Many published studies have estimated the association between the +331G/A (rs10895068) polymorphism in the progesterone receptor (PgR) gene and breast cancer risk. However, the results remain inconsistent and controversial. To address this inconsistency, we systematically interrogated the aforementioned association via a meta-analysis. Through a literature search, we identified 13 case-control studies, including 12,453 cases and 14,056 case-free controls. The strengths of reported associations were evaluated using odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs). An association was found between +331G/A polymorphism and +331G/A risk in the dominant model (p = 0.027). Via subgroup analysis, we found no association between +331G/A and breast cancer risk in Caucasians, Asians or mixed racial groups. Through meta-analysis, we were able to gain insight into previously reported associations between +331G/A polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, further studies are still needed to provide more evidence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 33%
Student > Master 2 22%
Researcher 2 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Arts and Humanities 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Unknown 1 11%