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Obstetric care navigation: a new approach to promote respectful maternity care and overcome barriers to safe motherhood

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
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Title
Obstetric care navigation: a new approach to promote respectful maternity care and overcome barriers to safe motherhood
Published in
Reproductive Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0410-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kirsten Austad, Anita Chary, Boris Martinez, Michel Juarez, Yolanda Juarez Martin, Enma Coyote Ixen, Peter Rohloff

Abstract

Disrespectful and abusive maternity care is a common and pervasive problem that disproportionately impacts marginalized women. By making mothers less likely to agree to facility-based delivery, it contributes to the unacceptably high rates of maternal mortality in low- and middle-income countries. Few programmatic approaches have been proposed to address disrespectful and abusive maternity care. Care navigation was pioneered by the field of oncology to improve health outcomes of vulnerable populations and promote patient autonomy by providing linkages across a fragmented care continuum. Here we describe the novel application of the care navigation model to emergency obstetric referrals to hospitals for complicated home births in rural Guatemala. Care navigators offer women accompaniment and labor support intended to improve the care experience-for both patients and providers-and to decrease opposition to hospital-level obstetric care. Specific roles include deflecting mistreatment from hospital staff, improving provider communication through language and cultural interpretation, advocating for patients' right to informed consent, and protecting patients' dignity during the birthing process. Care navigators are specifically chosen and trained to gain the trust and respect of patients, traditional midwives, and biomedical providers. We describe an ongoing obstetric care navigator pilot program employing rapid-cycle quality improvement methods to quickly identify implementation successes and failures. This approach empowers frontline health workers to problem solve in real time and ensures the program is highly adaptable to local needs. Care navigation is a promising strategy to overcome the "humanistic barrier" to hospital delivery by mitigating disrespectful and abusive care. It offers a demand-side approach to undignified obstetric care that empowers the communities most impacted by the problem to lead the response. Results from an ongoing pilot program of obstetric care navigation will provide valuable feedback from patients on the impact of this approach and implementation lessons to facilitate replication in other settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 15%
Student > Bachelor 22 15%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 9%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 26 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 44 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 21%
Social Sciences 16 11%
Engineering 4 3%
Psychology 3 2%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 39 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2019.
All research outputs
#1,220,435
of 15,839,660 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#119
of 1,047 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,965
of 319,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#20
of 118 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,839,660 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,047 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 319,872 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 118 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.