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Densovirus associated with sea-star wasting disease and mass mortality

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
66 news outlets
blogs
27 blogs
twitter
152 tweeters
facebook
30 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
363 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Densovirus associated with sea-star wasting disease and mass mortality
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, November 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1416625111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian Hewson, Jason B. Button, Brent M. Gudenkauf, Benjamin Miner, Alisa L. Newton, Joseph K. Gaydos, Janna Wynne, Cathy L. Groves, Gordon Hendler, Michael Murray, Steven Fradkin, Mya Breitbart, Elizabeth Fahsbender, Kevin D. Lafferty, A. Marm Kilpatrick, C. Melissa Miner, Peter Raimondi, Lesanna Lahner, Carolyn S. Friedman, Stephen Daniels, Martin Haulena, Jeffrey Marliave, Colleen A. Burge, Morgan E. Eisenlord, C. Drew Harvell

Abstract

Populations of at least 20 asteroid species on the Northeast Pacific Coast have recently experienced an extensive outbreak of sea-star (asteroid) wasting disease (SSWD). The disease leads to behavioral changes, lesions, loss of turgor, limb autotomy, and death characterized by rapid degradation ("melting"). Here, we present evidence from experimental challenge studies and field observations that link the mass mortalities to a densovirus (Parvoviridae). Virus-sized material (i.e., <0.2 μm) from symptomatic tissues that was inoculated into asymptomatic asteroids consistently resulted in SSWD signs whereas animals receiving heat-killed (i.e., control) virus-sized inoculum remained asymptomatic. Viral metagenomic investigations revealed the sea star-associated densovirus (SSaDV) as the most likely candidate virus associated with tissues from symptomatic asteroids. Quantification of SSaDV during transmission trials indicated that progression of SSWD paralleled increased SSaDV load. In field surveys, SSaDV loads were more abundant in symptomatic than in asymptomatic asteroids. SSaDV could be detected in plankton, sediments and in nonasteroid echinoderms, providing a possible mechanism for viral spread. SSaDV was detected in museum specimens of asteroids from 1942, suggesting that it has been present on the North American Pacific Coast for at least 72 y. SSaDV is therefore the most promising candidate disease agent responsible for asteroid mass mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 152 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 363 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 16 4%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Fiji 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 336 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 82 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 81 22%
Student > Master 60 17%
Researcher 53 15%
Unspecified 25 7%
Other 62 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 204 56%
Environmental Science 54 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 32 9%
Unspecified 32 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 2%
Other 32 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 829. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2019.
All research outputs
#5,405
of 12,980,093 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#213
of 79,113 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87
of 289,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3
of 951 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,980,093 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,113 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,631 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 951 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.