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Observation of the rare Bs0 →µ+µ− decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
142 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
25 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
22 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
254 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
221 Mendeley
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Title
Observation of the rare Bs0 →µ+µ− decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data
Published in
Nature, May 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14474
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The standard model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces. It provides precise predictions for measurable quantities that can be tested experimentally. The probabilities, or branching fractions, of the strange B meson () and the B(0) meson decaying into two oppositely charged muons (μ(+) and μ(-)) are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to theories that extend the standard model. The standard model predicts that the and decays are very rare, with about four of the former occurring for every billion mesons produced, and one of the latter occurring for every ten billion B(0) mesons. A difference in the observed branching fractions with respect to the predictions of the standard model would provide a direction in which the standard model should be extended. Before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN started operating, no evidence for either decay mode had been found. Upper limits on the branching fractions were an order of magnitude above the standard model predictions. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) collaborations have performed a joint analysis of the data from proton-proton collisions that they collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of seven teraelectronvolts and in 2012 at eight teraelectronvolts. Here we report the first observation of the µ(+)µ(-) decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement so far of its branching fraction. Furthermore, we obtained evidence for the µ(+)µ(-) decay with a statistical significance of three standard deviations. Both measurements are statistically compatible with standard model predictions and allow stringent constraints to be placed on theories beyond the standard model. The LHC experiments will resume taking data in 2015, recording proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 teraelectronvolts, which will approximately double the production rates of and B(0) mesons and lead to further improvements in the precision of these crucial tests of the standard model.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 142 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 215 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 58 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 15%
Student > Master 21 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 8%
Professor 13 6%
Other 50 23%
Unknown 29 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 112 51%
Engineering 9 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 4%
Computer Science 8 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 37 17%
Unknown 39 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 454. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2021.
All research outputs
#32,768
of 17,697,618 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#3,437
of 80,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#397
of 316,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#54
of 967 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,697,618 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,194 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 90.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,309 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 967 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.