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The acceptability of intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy: results from a qualitative study in Northern Ghana

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2014
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153 Mendeley
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Title
The acceptability of intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy: results from a qualitative study in Northern Ghana
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-13-432
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher Pell, Arantza Meñaca, Samuel Chatio, Abraham Hodgson, Harry Tagbor, Robert Pool

Abstract

Affecting mother and child, malaria during pregnancy (MiP) provokes a double morbidity and mortality burden. Within a package of interventions to prevent MiP in endemic areas, the WHO currently recommends intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). Concerns about anti-malarial resistance have however prompted interest in intermittent screening and treating (IST) as an alternative approach to IPTp. IST involves screening for malaria infection at scheduled antenatal care (ANC) clinic visits and treating malaria cases. In light of the need to comprehensively evaluate new interventions prior to roll out, this article explores the acceptability of IST with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) compared to IPTp with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and in Upper East Region, northern Ghana.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Cameroon 1 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Unknown 149 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 58 38%
Researcher 27 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Student > Postgraduate 8 5%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 20 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 16%
Social Sciences 17 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 26 17%