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Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, February 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 628)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, February 2009
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-5-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Don J Durzan

Abstract

Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
China 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 38 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 22%
Student > Master 7 17%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Other 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 22%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2020.
All research outputs
#857,726
of 15,350,361 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#14
of 628 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,042
of 304,909 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,350,361 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 628 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,909 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.