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Influence of Precipitation and Crop Germination on Resource Selection by Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in Southwest Colorado

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2017
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Title
Influence of Precipitation and Crop Germination on Resource Selection by Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in Southwest Colorado
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-15482-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily M. Carrollo, Heather E. Johnson, Justin W. Fischer, Matthew Hammond, Patricia D. Dorsey, Charles Anderson, Kurt C. Vercauteren, W. David Walter

Abstract

Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations in the western United States provide many benefits to local economies but can also cause considerable damage to agriculture, particularly damage to lucrative crops. Limited information exists to understand resource selection of mule deer in response to annual variation in crop rotation and climatic conditions. We tested the hypothesis that mule deer select certain crops, and in particular sunflower, based on annual climatic variability. Our objective was to use movements, estimates of home range, and resource selection analysis to identify resources selected by mule deer. We used annually-derived crop-specific datasets along with Global Positioning System collars to monitor 14 mule deer in an agricultural area near public lands in southwestern Colorado, USA. We estimated home ranges for two winter seasons that ranged between 7.68 and 9.88 km(2), and for two summer seasons that ranged between 5.51 and 6.24 km(2). Mule deer selected areas closer to forest and alfalfa for most periods during 2012, but selected areas closer to sunflower in a majority of periods during 2013. Considerable annual variation in climate patterns and precipitation levels appeared to influence selection by mule deer because of variability in crop rotation and success of germination of specific crops.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 33%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 58%
Environmental Science 2 17%
Physics and Astronomy 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,714,520
of 12,149,975 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#38,733
of 54,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,724
of 251,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#4,290
of 6,627 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,149,975 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 54,320 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 6,627 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.