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Age-specific Plasmodium parasite profile in pre and post ITN intervention period at a highland site in western Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Age-specific Plasmodium parasite profile in pre and post ITN intervention period at a highland site in western Kenya
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2119-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ednah N. Ototo, Guofa Zhou, Lucy Kamau, Jenard P. Mbugi, Christine L. Wanjala, Maxwell Machani, Harrysone Atieli, Andrew K. Githeko, Guiyun Yan

Abstract

Monitoring and evaluation of entomological, parasitological and clinical data is an important component of malaria control as it is a measure of the success of the interventions. In many studies, clinical data has been used to monitor trends in malaria morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to demonstrate age dependent prevalence of malaria in the pre- and post-interventions period. A series of cross-sectional malaria parasitological surveys were conducted in Iguhu, western Kenya. Participants were randomly selected school-aged children between 6 and 13 years. The study was conducted between June 2002-December 2003 and January 2012-February 2015. Sexual and asexual parasite prevalence and densities were determined using microscopy. Age-dependence in parasite infections was compared between 2002-2003 and 2012-2015. Plasmodium falciparum had the highest prevalence of 43.5 and 11.5% in the pre- and post-intervention periods. Plasmodium malariae had a prevalence of 2.3 and 0.2%, while Plasmodium ovale had a prevalence of 0.3 and 0.1% during the pre- and post-intervention period, respectively. There was a 73.7% reduction in prevalence of P. falciparum in the post-intervention compared to the pre-intervention period. Plasmodium falciparum parasite density increased by 71.2% between pre- and post-intervention period from (geometric mean of) 554.4-949.2 parasites/µl. Geometric mean gametocytaemia in Iguhu was higher in the post-intervention period (106.4 parasites/µl), when compared to the pre-intervention period (54.1 parasites/µl). Prevalence and density of P. falciparum showed a lower age-dependency during post-intervention period when compared to pre-intervention period. The study provides evidence for reduction of malaria prevalence following the introduction of LLINs and ACT in western Kenya. Fewer people become infected but the few infected may be more infectious as suggested by higher gametocyte densities. The high parasite densities, which were not dependent on age, observed in the post intervention period imply that a more comprehensive integrated malaria management may be required to sustain the current interventions and hence reduce malaria transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 15%
Professor 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 15%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 8 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2018.
All research outputs
#693,749
of 15,224,588 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#102
of 4,344 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,101
of 401,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#19
of 491 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,224,588 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,344 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 401,064 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 491 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.