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Severe Pollution in China Amplified by Atmospheric Moisture

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
101 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
Severe Pollution in China Amplified by Atmospheric Moisture
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-15909-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xuexi Tie, Ru-Jin Huang, Junji Cao, Qiang Zhang, Yafang Cheng, Hang Su, Di Chang, Ulrich Pöschl, Thorsten Hoffmann, Uli Dusek, Guohui Li, Douglas R. Worsnop, Colin D. O’Dowd

Abstract

In recent years, severe haze events often occurred in China, causing serious environmental problems. The mechanisms responsible for the haze formation, however, are still not well understood, hindering the forecast and mitigation of haze pollution. Our study of the 2012-13 winter haze events in Beijing shows that atmospheric water vapour plays a critical role in enhancing the heavy haze events. Under weak solar radiation and stagnant moist meteorological conditions in winter, air pollutants and water vapour accumulate in a shallow planetary boundary layer (PBL). A positive feedback cycle is triggered resulting in the formation of heavy haze: (1) the dispersal of water vapour is constrained by the shallow PBL, leading to an increase in relative humidity (RH); (2) the high RH induces an increase of aerosol particle size by enhanced hygroscopic growth and multiphase reactions to increase particle size and mass, which results in (3) further dimming and decrease of PBL height, and thus further depressing of aerosol and water vapour in a very shallow PBL. This positive feedback constitutes a self-amplification mechanism in which water vapour leads to a trapping and massive increase of particulate matter in the near-surface air to which people are exposed with severe health hazards.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 22%
Researcher 15 17%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 5 6%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 26 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 18 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 15%
Chemistry 8 9%
Energy 3 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 31 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2018.
All research outputs
#340,708
of 12,459,998 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,994
of 56,941 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,296
of 371,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,252
of 17,333 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,459,998 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 56,941 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17,333 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.