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Levels of human replication factor C4, a clamp loader, correlate with tumor progression and predict the prognosis for colorectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2014
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Title
Levels of human replication factor C4, a clamp loader, correlate with tumor progression and predict the prognosis for colorectal cancer
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12967-014-0320-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun Xiang, Lekun Fang, Yanxin Luo, Zuli Yang, Yi Liao, Ji Cui, Meijin Huang, Zihuan Yang, Yan Huang, Xinjuan Fan, Huashe Wang, Lei Wang, Junsheng Peng, Jianping Wang

Abstract

BackgroundHuman replication factor C4 (RFC4) is involved in DNA replication as a clamp loader and is aberrantly regulated across a range of cancers. The current study aimed to investigate the function of RFC4 in colorectal cancer (CRC).MethodsThe mRNA levels of RFC4 were assessed in 30 paired primary CRC tissues and matched normal colonic tissues by quantitative PCR. The protein expression levels of RFC4 were evaluated by western blotting (n =16) and immunohistochemistry (IHC; n =49), respectively. Clinicopathological features and survival data were correlated with the expression of RFC4 by IHC analysis in a tissue microarray comprising 331 surgically resected CRC. The impact of RFC4 on cell proliferation and the cell cycle was assessed using CRC cell lines.Results RFC4 expression was significantly increased in CRC specimens as compared to adjacent normal colonic tissues (P <0.05). High levels of RFC4, determined on a tissue microarray, were significantly associated with differentiation, an advanced stage by the Tumor-Node-Metastasis (TNM) staging system, and a poor prognosis, as compared to low levels of expression (P <0.05). However, in multivariate analysis, RFC4 was not an independent predictor of poor survival for CRC. In vitro studies, the loss of RFC4 suppressed CRC cell proliferation and induced S-phase cell cycle arrest.Conclusion RFC4 is frequently overexpressed in CRC, and is associated with tumor progression and worse survival outcome. This might be attributed to the regulation of CRC cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest by RFC4.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 33%
Student > Master 3 25%
Lecturer 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Chemical Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2014.
All research outputs
#2,325,514
of 4,531,279 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#657
of 1,272 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,334
of 139,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#50
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,531,279 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,272 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.