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Liraglutide Reduces Oxidative Stress And Restores Heme Oxygenase-1 and Ghrelin Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Pilot Study

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, February 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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3 patents

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Liraglutide Reduces Oxidative Stress And Restores Heme Oxygenase-1 and Ghrelin Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Pilot Study
Published in
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, February 2015
DOI 10.1210/jc.2014-2291
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manfredi Rizzo, Nicola Abate, Manisha Chandalia, Ali A. Rizvi, Rosaria V. Giglio, Dragana Nikolic, Antonella Marino Gammazza, Ignazio Barbagallo, Esma R. Isenovic, Maciej Banach, Giuseppe Montalto, Giovanni Li Volti

Abstract

Context: Liraglutide is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog and glucose-lowering agent whose effects on cardiovascular risk markers have not been fully elucidated. Objective: We evaluated the impact of liraglutide on markers of oxidative stress, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and plasma ghrelin levels in patients with type-2 diabetes (T2DM). Design and setting: A prospective pilot study of two months' duration performed at the Unit of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Prevention at University of Palermo, Italy. Patients and Intervention(s): 20 subjects with T2DM (10 men and 10 women, mean age: 57±13 years) were treated with liraglutide subcutaneously (0.6mg/daily for 2 weeks, followed by 1.2mg/daily) in addition to metformin (1500 mg/daily orally) for 2 months. Patients with liver disorders or renal failure were excluded. Main Outcome Measure(s): Plasma ghrelin concentrations, oxidative stress markers, and heat-shock proteins, including HO-1. Results: The addition of liraglutide resulted in a significant decrease in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (8.5±0.4 vs. 7.5±0.4%, p<0.0001). In addition, plasma ghrelin and glutathione (GSH) concentrations increased (8.2±4.1 vs. 13.6±7.3 pg/ml, p=0.0007 and 0.36±0.06 vs. 0.44±0.07 nmol/ml, p=0.0002, respectively), while serum lipid hydroperoxides and HO-1 decreased (0.11±0.05 vs. 0.04±0.07 pg/ml, p=0.0487 and 7.7±7.7 vs. 3.6±1.8 pg/ml, p=0.0445, respectively). These changes were not correlated with changes in fasting glycemia or HbA1c. Conclusions: In a 2-months prospective pilot study, the addition of liraglutide to metformin resulted in improvement in oxidative stress as well as plasma ghrelin and HO-1 concentrations in patients with T2DM. These findings appeared to be independent of the known effects of liraglutide on glucose metabolism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Student > Master 11 17%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,496,799
of 18,166,797 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
#2,008
of 13,158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,486
of 318,641 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
#31
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,166,797 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,158 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,641 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.