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Aging disrupts cell subpopulation dynamics and diminishes the function of mesenchymal stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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77 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
Title
Aging disrupts cell subpopulation dynamics and diminishes the function of mesenchymal stem cells
Published in
Scientific Reports, November 2014
DOI 10.1038/srep07144
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominik Duscher, Robert C. Rennert, Michael Januszyk, Ersilia Anghel, Zeshaan N. Maan, Alexander J. Whittam, Marcelina G. Perez, Revanth Kosaraju, Michael S. Hu, Graham G. Walmsley, David Atashroo, Sacha Khong, Atul J. Butte, Geoffrey C. Gurtner

Abstract

Advanced age is associated with an increased risk of vascular morbidity, attributable in part to impairments in new blood vessel formation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to play an important role in neovascularization and deficiencies in these cells have been described in aged patients. Here we utilize single cell transcriptional analysis to determine the effect of aging on MSC population dynamics. We identify an age-related depletion of a subpopulation of MSCs characterized by a pro-vascular transcriptional profile. Supporting this finding, we demonstrate that aged MSCs are also significantly compromised in their ability to support vascular network formation in vitro and in vivo. Finally, aged MSCs are unable to rescue age-associated impairments in cutaneous wound healing. Taken together, these data suggest that age-related changes in MSC population dynamics result in impaired therapeutic potential of aged progenitor cells. These findings have critical implications for therapeutic cell source decisions (autologous versus allogeneic) and indicate the necessity of strategies to improve functionality of aged MSCs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 73 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Unspecified 11 14%
Other 8 11%
Student > Master 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 21%
Unspecified 14 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 4 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,929,458
of 12,476,678 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#14,019
of 57,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,698
of 282,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#21
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,476,678 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 57,150 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,160 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.