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The fluid management of adults with severe malaria

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
The fluid management of adults with severe malaria
Published in
Critical Care, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13054-014-0642-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josh Hanson, Nicholas M Anstey, David Bihari, Nicholas J White, Nicholas P Day, Arjen M Dondorp

Abstract

Fluid resuscitation has long been considered a key intervention in the treatment of adults with severe falciparum malaria. Profound hypovolemia is common in these patients and has the potential to exacerbate the acidosis and acute kidney injury that are independent predictors of death. However, new microvascular imaging techniques have shown that disease severity correlates more strongly with obstruction of the microcirculation by parasitized erythrocytes - a process termed sequestration. Fluid loading has little effect on sequestration and increases the risk of complications, particularly pulmonary edema, a condition that can develop suddenly and unpredictably and that is frequently fatal in this population. Accordingly, even if a patient is clinically hypovolemic, if there is an adequate blood pressure and urine output, there may be little advantage in infusing intravenous fluid beyond a maintenance rate of 1 to 2 mL/kg per hour. The optimal agent for fluid resuscitation remains uncertain; significant anemia requires blood transfusion, but colloid solutions may be associated with harm and should be avoided. The preferred crystalloid is unclear, although the use of balanced solutions requires investigation. There are fewer data to guide the fluid management of severe vivax and knowlesi malaria, although a similar conservative strategy would appear prudent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Master 7 10%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 16 23%
Unknown 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2019.
All research outputs
#5,108,680
of 17,140,695 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#3,068
of 5,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,791
of 313,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#154
of 230 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,140,695 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,281 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 230 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.