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Increasing upper limb training intensity in chronic stroke using embodied virtual reality: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, November 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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267 Mendeley
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Title
Increasing upper limb training intensity in chronic stroke using embodied virtual reality: a pilot study
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12984-017-0328-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Perez-Marcos, Odile Chevalley, Thomas Schmidlin, Gangadhar Garipelli, Andrea Serino, Philippe Vuadens, Tej Tadi, Olaf Blanke, José d. R. Millán

Abstract

Technology-mediated neurorehabilitation is suggested to enhance training intensity and therefore functional gains. Here, we used a novel virtual reality (VR) system for task-specific upper extremity training after stroke. The system offers interactive exercises integrating motor priming techniques and embodied visuomotor feedback. In this pilot study, we examined (i) rehabilitation dose and training intensity, (ii) functional improvements, and (iii) safety and tolerance when exposed to intensive VR rehabilitation. Ten outpatient stroke survivors with chronic (>6 months) upper extremity paresis participated in a ten-session VR-based upper limb rehabilitation program (2 sessions/week). All participants completed all sessions of the treatment. In total, they received a median of 403 min of upper limb therapy, with 290 min of effective training. Within that time, participants performed a median of 4713 goal-directed movements. Importantly, training intensity increased progressively across sessions from 13.2 to 17.3 movements per minute. Clinical measures show that despite being in the chronic phase, where recovery potential is thought to be limited, participants showed a median improvement rate of 5.3% in motor function (Fugl-Meyer Assessment for Upper Extremity; FMA-UE) post intervention compared to baseline, and of 15.4% at one-month follow-up. For three of them, this improvement was clinically significant. A significant improvement in shoulder active range of motion (AROM) was also observed at follow-up. Participants reported very low levels of pain, stress and fatigue following each session of training, indicating that the intensive VR intervention was well tolerated. No severe adverse events were reported. All participants expressed their interest in continuing the intervention at the hospital or even at home, suggesting high levels of adherence and motivation for the provided intervention. This pilot study showed how a dedicated VR system could deliver high rehabilitation doses and, importantly, intensive training in chronic stroke survivors. FMA-UE and AROM results suggest that task-specific VR training may be beneficial for further functional recovery both in the chronic stage of stroke. Longitudinal studies with higher doses and sample sizes are required to confirm the therapy effectiveness. This trial was retrospectively registered at ClinicalTrials.gov database (registration number NCT03094650 ) on 14 March 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 267 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 267 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 54 20%
Student > Bachelor 47 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 12%
Researcher 20 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 40 15%
Unknown 60 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 62 23%
Neuroscience 29 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 8%
Engineering 20 7%
Computer Science 19 7%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 79 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2019.
All research outputs
#4,081,389
of 15,627,084 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#252
of 942 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,925
of 410,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#29
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,627,084 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 942 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 410,118 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.