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Canadian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years (0–4 years): exploring the perceptions of stakeholders and end users regarding their acceptability, barriers to uptake, and dissemination

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Canadian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years (0–4 years): exploring the perceptions of stakeholders and end users regarding their acceptability, barriers to uptake, and dissemination
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4853-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Negin Riazi, Subha Ramanathan, Meghan O’Neill, Mark S. Tremblay, Guy Faulkner

Abstract

It is important to engage stakeholders and end users in the development of guidelines for knowledge translation purposes. The aim of this study was to examine stakeholders' (experts in pediatric and family medicine, physical activity knowledge translation, and research) and end users' (parents and early childhood educators) perceptions of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years (0-4 years). Stakeholders (n = 10) engaged in telephone interviews and end users (n = 92) participated in focus groups (n = 14) to discuss perceived clarity and need for the guidelines, potential barriers to implementation, identification of credible messengers, and methods for dissemination of the guidelines. A thematic analysis was conducted. The proposed guidelines were very well received by both stakeholders and end users. A clear need for such guidelines was identified, and most believed the guidelines were achievable. Stakeholders and end users identified several potential barriers to uptake, including low awareness of current guidelines; 'daily challenges' such as allure of screen time, lack of time, and competing priorities; and challenges in the context of shifting social norms. A range of methods and messengers of dissemination were identified. Medical and child care settings were the most frequently cited places for dissemination, and physicians and early childhood educators were the most common suggestions for messengers. There was consistent support for the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years (0-4 years) from both stakeholders and end users. Moving forward, it is important to dedicate appropriate support and funding toward dissemination efforts in order to reach end users, particularly parents and early childhood educators.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Master 8 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 7%
Student > Postgraduate 4 4%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 47 48%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 15 15%
Sports and Recreations 13 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 4%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 47 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2017.
All research outputs
#2,696,144
of 12,247,570 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,722
of 8,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,439
of 341,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#83
of 234 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,247,570 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 341,821 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 234 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.