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HIV-1 pathogenicity and virion production are dependent on the metabolic phenotype of activated CD4+ T cells

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology: Research & Treatment, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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33 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
HIV-1 pathogenicity and virion production are dependent on the metabolic phenotype of activated CD4+ T cells
Published in
Retrovirology: Research & Treatment, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12977-014-0098-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea Hegedus, Maia Kavanagh Williamson, Hendrik Huthoff

Abstract

BackgroundHIV-1, like all viruses, is entirely dependent on the host cell for providing the metabolic resources for completion of the viral replication cycle and the production of virions. It is well established that HIV-1 replicates efficiently in activated CD4+ T cells, whereas resting CD4+ T cells are refractory to infection with HIV-1. A hallmark of T cell activation is the upregulation of glycolysis to meet the biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs of cell proliferation and the execution of effector functions by the secretion of cytokines. To date, it has remained unknown if HIV-1 requires the high glycolytic activity of activated T cells to support its replication.ResultsWe report that in primary CD4+ T cells, the flux through the glycolytic pathway is increased upon infection with HIV-1. This increase in glycolytic activity does not occur in T cell lines when infected with HIV-1. By providing cells with galactose instead of glucose, the former being a poor substrate for glycolysis, we monitored the effect of preventing glycolysis in CD4+ T cells on virus replication cycle and cell fate. We observed that HIV-1 infected primary CD4+ T cells cultured in galactose have a survival advantage over those cultured in glucose and this coincides with reduced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis in cultures with galactose. T cell lines do not recapitulate this difference in cell death. Finally, we demonstrate that virion production is dependent on glycolysis as cultures containing galactose yield reduced amounts of HIV-1 virions compared with cultures containing glucose.ConclusionsThe replication of HIV-1 in primary CD4+ T cells causes an increase in glycolytic flux of the cell. Glycolysis is particularly required for virion production and additionally increases the sensitivity of the infected cell to virus-induced cell death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 9 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 December 2014.
All research outputs
#2,830,079
of 10,677,937 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology: Research & Treatment
#113
of 453 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,969
of 247,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology: Research & Treatment
#8
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,677,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 453 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,422 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.