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Testing the nutritional-limitation, predator-avoidance, and storm-avoidance hypotheses for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, November 2014
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Title
Testing the nutritional-limitation, predator-avoidance, and storm-avoidance hypotheses for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska
Published in
Oecologia, November 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00442-014-3149-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan L. Stewart, Brenda Konar, M. Tim Tinker

Abstract

Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) inhabiting the Aleutian Islands have stabilized at low abundance levels following a decline and currently exhibit restricted habitat-utilization patterns. Possible explanations for restricted habitat use by sea otters can be classified into two fundamentally different processes, bottom-up and top-down forcing. Bottom-up hypotheses argue that changes in the availability or nutritional quality of prey resources have led to the selective use of habitats that support the highest quality prey. In contrast, top-down hypotheses argue that increases in predation pressure from killer whales have led to the selective use of habitats that provide the most effective refuge from killer whale predation. A third hypothesis suggests that current restricted habitat use is based on a need for protection from storms. We tested all three hypotheses for restricted habitat use by comparing currently used and historically used sea otter foraging locations for: (1) prey availability and quality, (2) structural habitat complexity, and (3) exposure to prevailing storms. Our findings suggest that current use is based on physical habitat complexity and not on prey availability, prey quality, or protection from storms, providing further evidence for killer whale predation as a cause for restricted sea otter habitat use in the Aleutian Islands.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Mexico 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 27%
Student > Master 9 24%
Researcher 6 16%
Other 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 65%
Environmental Science 7 19%
Unspecified 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2014.
All research outputs
#10,340,657
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,760
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,882
of 294,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#49
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.